Your Life Matters

Here’s what I heard God speaking to me this morning: “If your wife came to you and said, ‘I don’t feel like you love me.’” You wouldn’t argue that she shouldn’t feel that way or defend yourself. That would be unloving. You would say, ‘I do love you. I’m sorry I made you feel that way. Let’s fix this so it doesn’t happen again.’ So if the black community says, ‘I don’t feel like you love me.’ You shouldn’t argue that they shouldn’t feel that way or defend yourself. That would be unloving. You say, ‘I do love you. I’m sorry I made you feel that way. Let’s fix this so it doesn’t happen again.’”

When Tragedy Strikes

This last week, our nation experienced a tragedy. You know what I repeatedly notice during any tragedy? That people always want to tell each other how to respond to said tragedy.

At the same time, you will hear voices giving their opinions about the real lesson to take away. Often, opinions follow statements of arrogant reproof like, “Why don’t we stop focusing on ___, and start talking about ___.”

In any tragedy, the same voices reappear over and over again:

The God-focused voice: This person feels it’s his or her duty to remind everyone that God is good, He is loving, and He is in control. This, while good-intentioned, can be an inappropriate reaction. Most Christians, aren’t questioning God’s nature when tragedy strikes, and most non-believers won’t benefit from a poker-faced “praise God” in those moments. The God-focused voice needs to be tempered with a strong dose of people-focus, otherwise it comes across cold and uncaring. The God-focused voice also needs to graduate from elementary regurgitation of spiritual tag-lines, and move towards analysis and application of what God has said in His word. This voice needs to ask, “What does God say about tragedy, and how should we react to it?” This allows the God-focused person to be helpful to lost people. Continue reading “When Tragedy Strikes”